When BILD takes the stage: Reflections on a recent BILD conference talk

~ by Mela Sarkar, Stephen Davis, Kathleen Green, Emmanouela Tisizi, and Alison Crump

On Thursday, May 11, several members of the BILD group (Mela Sarkar, Stephen Davis, Kathleen Green(Apple), Emmanouela Tisizi) gave a boundary-breaking group presentation at the ACFAS (Association francophone pour le savoir) congress, in a conference organized by the QUESCREN (Réseau de recherche sur les communautés québécoises d’expression anglaise) called “Les 40 ans de la loi 101 : la Charte de la langue française et les communautés québécoises d’expression anglaise, 1977-2017.”

The original title for the talk was:

Critical sociolinguistic research in post-Bill-101 Quebec: mixage & métissage as the new normal

The title that appeared on the program was:

La recherche sociolinguistique critique dans le Québec de l’après-loi 101 : le mixage et le métissage comme nouvelle norme

And, the title we ended up using was:

Critical Sociolinguistic Research dans le Québec de l’après-bill 101 : le mixage et le métissage comme new normal

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“Fais le give-and-go!”: Reflections on translanguaging in Parc Jarry basketball (by Stephen Davis)

Weaving through a tapestry of pedestrians, pylons, Peugeots, and police officers, I find myself contemplating Montréal’s sisyphèsque construction schedule and wondering whether Camus was properly cited in the city planning documents. Rue Jarry is a zoo at the best of times, but now we’re down to one lane and I’m praying that my rusty bike chain and the crusty driver behind me can make it through the next few minutes without snapping altogether. We approach a red light, so I catch my breath while several young families hustle and bustle into the shops and restaurants that decorate the street. Now it’s green, so on y va, and I swerve into sun-soaked Parc Jarry, the site of some of the best basketball and translanguaging Montréal has to offer. Continue reading

Language confidence (by Melissa J. Enns)

BILD is very happy to welcome Melissa J. Enns as our latest guest blogger. Melissa is a graduate student in McGill’s Master of Arts in Second Language Education program. Prior to entering the program, she taught ESL at an academic prep school in Saskatchewan. Her thesis research will center on bridging the gap between research and practice. She authors a language education blog, Ramblings of a Linguaphile. With an undergraduate degree in linguistics and Spanish, she is fascinated by all aspects of language, language acquisition, and language teaching.

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In her discussion of translanguaging in Kolkata, Dr. Mela Sarkar beautifully said, “If one is prepared to be linguistically adventurous, I don’t see why there would be any limit to the number of places where one can feel local.”

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Back to Bangla: Rediscovering translanguaging (by Dr. Mela Sarkar)

Bengali, properly called Bangla, is the language of Bangladesh and of the Indian state of West Bengal. It’s one of the languages I would have grown up speaking if my parents had settled in India in the late 1950s. They planned to. After I was born in Kolkata (Calcutta until 2001), my father looked hard for a faculty post in an Indian university, one that would have made it possible to raise a family of half-and-half children in India with his Ukrainian-Canadian wife (my Manitoba Ukrainian family appeared in this blog a while back).

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Translanguaging pedagogy: ¿Qué significa? (by Dr. Alison Crump)

This term, I’m teaching a graduate course called Educational Sociolinguistics and we’re blogging (the course blog is here). In the course, we explore social, cultural, and political dimensions of (second) language education, and there’s a lot of resonance with what we write about here in the BILD community. The course blog is our public facing space for ongoing ‘sociolinguistic noticing.’ This is the practice of reflecting on connections between our own (and others’) language teaching and learning experiences and sociolinguistic issues (e.g., identity, social status, place, race, gender, language variation, language ideologies, multilingualism, language policy, etc.). Continue reading