Stickiness of language and culture: Identity in the making (by Sunny Man Chu Lau)

Sunny Man Chu Lau is Associate Professor in the School of Education at Bishop’s University in Quebec, Canada. Her interest in and advocacy for critical approaches to second language (L2) learning can be traced back to her English language experience both as a learner and as an educator in Hong Kong. Born and raised in this former British colony, since very young, she came to know and experience the hegemonic power of ESL, “English as a superior language” (Pennycook, 1998), in everyday life and how it impacted learners’ relationship with the language as well as with their life chances. For more about Sunny see our Active Members page.

Affect is an impingement or extrusion of a momentary or sometimes more sustained state of relation as well as the passage (and the duration of passage) of forces or intensities. That is, affect is found in those intensities that pass from body to body (human, nonhuman, part-body, and otherwise), in those resonances that circulate about, between, and sometimes stick to bodies and worlds, and in the very passages or variations between these intensities and resonances themselves. (Seigworth & Gregg, 2010, p. 1).

Seigworth and Gregg (2010) describe how affect is fundamentally visceral and material, circulating between bodies and environment, shaping and shaped by different political, economic, and cultural forces. This material and social view of emotions prompts to ask how one is affected, by one’s experience with language, into action or non-action regarding language learning. Our emotional attachment, the “stickiness” (Ahmed, 2004) of certain language and cultural practices is a “product of history and society” (Busch, 2015). My language portrait attempts to show the bricolage of my experiences, past, present and projective, and how they get attached onto my body:

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Translanguaging for communication and identity (re)building: The story of a 74-year old Brazilian woman in Montreal (by Angelica Galante)

Angelica was born in São Paulo, Brazil, and has both Italian and Spanish heritage. Growing up, she would flexibly use Italian, Spanish and Portuguese in conversations and mixing languages has always been something natural for her. She attended Universidade de São Paulo, Brock University, and completed a PhD in language education at OISE/University of Toronto. Angelica moved to Montreal in 2018, when she accepted a position as assistant professor in Applied Linguistics at Concordia University and became a BILD member . For more about Angelica see our Active Members page.

After decades of research, the field of applied linguistics has finally recognized that languages in fact constantly and actively interact with one another, making it difficult to completely switch off one language while keeping another turned on. Continue reading

Immersion langagière à Toronto avant le début de la session (par Édouard Laniel-Tremblay)

This second “hors série” post by a McGill MA student who was inspired to write about the recent Language Policy and Planning conference in Toronto comes to you mid-week. We are seizing every possible opportunity to remind our readers that BILD will take over the organizing of this conference the year after next. We hope to see you in Canada’s most linguistically politicized city in August 2020. Montreal—where language policy and planning are what you pick up at the dépanneur…

Du 24 au 26 août dernier s’est déroulée à Toronto la septième édition de la conférence Multidisciplinary Approaches in Language Policy and Planning (Approches multidisciplinaires en politiques et planification linguistiques)

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How Will I Belong? (by Afrouz Tavakoli)

The guest blogger who opens our regular blogging for 2018-19, Afrouz Tavakoli, is a second year Educational Studies PhD student in the Department of Integrated Studies at McGill University. She completed a degree in Women’s Studies at Concordia University and has a BA in International Relations from Webster University of Geneva, Switzerland. Afrouz is interested in the process of identity formation and belonging as relational and social phenomena. Her inspiration in writing a graphic novel, excerpted here (illustrations by M. Ali Ziaie), was to deconstruct how the interplay of social and power dynamics influences the sense of self and belonging of migrants. Through the graphic novel form she has examined the additional challenges for those immigrants who are categorized as Muslim and Middle Eastern in the current Islamophobia era. In her doctoral dissertation, by drawing on critical pedagogy, Afrouz will be studying how educational institutions in Canada can facilitate self-conscious awareness raising of Middle Eastern Muslim women so that they can autonomously craft and integrate their dual identity as Canadian-Muslim women. Continue reading

Ouvrir les yeux, les oreilles et le cœur des futurs enseignants de français par une approche biographique (by Dr. Catherine Levasseur)

Cette session, je suis chargée de cours à la Faculté des sciences de l’éducation de l’Université de Montréal et j’ai le plaisir de donner le cours de Sociolinguistique et FLS (français, langue seconde). Ce cours s’adresse à de futurs enseignants de français susceptibles de se retrouver dans des classes d’accueil au primaire et au secondaire ou encore d’enseigner la francisation aux adultes immigrants. Mon objectif dans ce cours peut se résumer grossièrement à sensibiliser ces futurs enseignants de français langue seconde aux enjeux de diversité linguistique à l’école québécoise. Continue reading