Empathy and Diversity (by Jacqueline Peters)

The more a teacher knows about a student, the more equipped [they are] to organize an instructional program that caters directly [the student’s] social and intellectual needs (Warren, 2014).

My doctoral thesis examines empathy in social institutions, specifically medical institutions. One of my chapters will be on race and empathy. Recent events both here and in the US have got me thinking about diversity (or lack thereof) and empathy (or lack thereof). My questions here are on where empathy fits into a discussion on diversity, and on what, if any, effect empathy has on the creation of, or dealings with, diversity. To this end, and to bring to a close my blog entries for this academic year, I’d like to talk about how empathy affects diversity in the classroom.

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Ouvrir les yeux, les oreilles et le cœur des futurs enseignants de français par une approche biographique (by Dr. Catherine Levasseur)

Cette session, je suis chargée de cours à la Faculté des sciences de l’éducation de l’Université de Montréal et j’ai le plaisir de donner le cours de Sociolinguistique et FLS (français, langue seconde). Ce cours s’adresse à de futurs enseignants de français susceptibles de se retrouver dans des classes d’accueil au primaire et au secondaire ou encore d’enseigner la francisation aux adultes immigrants. Mon objectif dans ce cours peut se résumer grossièrement à sensibiliser ces futurs enseignants de français langue seconde aux enjeux de diversité linguistique à l’école québécoise. Continue reading

I don’t quite get it. The ongoing acknowledgment of one’s privilege (by Dr. Catherine Levasseur)

As a white French heterosexual Québécoise, I know for a fact that life is pretty easy for me. If I’m in a job or apartment hunting, I have a good chance to find something convenient. If I travel, crossing borders is, at worst, a loss of time and, at best, a way to practise my languages. No one questions my last name, my skin colour, my nationality, my sexual orientation, my intentions, or my dangerousness. I understand that this is no coincidence. I am not a particularly lucky person. In fact, luck has nothing to do with it. It’s all about privilege.

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