A Roller Coaster of Questions: The Bi[Multi]lingualism Identity in French Second Language Education (by Jessica Irvine)

Jessica Irvine resides on Treaty 4 land – Home of the Nakota, Dakota, Lakota, Saulteaux, Nêhiyawak (Cree), and Métis. She completed her Bachelor of Education in French Education at the University of Regina. Currently she teaches grade 1 through 8 Core French with Regina Public Schools. She has also returned to the University of Regina and is completing her Masters of Education in Curriculum and Instruction. Her research interests include curriculum development, language policy, identity theory, cultural, Indigenous language revitalization, creating curriculums based on one’s “place”, lifewriting, qualitative inquiry, Indigenous methodologies, bilingualism, and multilingualism. Jessica’s thesis will focus on the cultural outcomes of the Saskatchewan Core French curriculum from both Indigenous and non-Indigenous perspectives. When Jessica isn’t writing, reading, or researching, she is either out running or hiking with her 4-legged running partner, Ginny, or training for Spartan obstacle course races.

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A not-so null hypothesis (by Rhonda Chung)

In quantitative research terms, I am the margin of error. I am the thing that is ungeneralizable. I am the population that does not yield significant results. How would you characterize my dispersion? What behaviour could someone like me produce that typifies the general populace? What measure of mean, mode, or median would I show up on? How standard is my perceived deviation?

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The space in between (by Andrew Jackson)

Our guest blogger this week, Andrew Jackson, is an artist who engages with the challenges of representation and narration through the medium of photography. His interventions focus on migration, memory and notions of urbanism. Andrew is a recent recipient of the Light Works Residency in Syracuse (2018) and Arts Council England’s Artist International Development fund, which enabled him to develop a work exploring language, identity and the spaces of Montreal. He is working towards a major exhibition in Birmingham, UK in 2018 exploring the Jamaican Diaspora. A graduate of the MA Documentary program at Newport in Wales, Andrew has since undertaken both self-initiated and commissioned works in the UK and abroad.

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Raising a multilingual child (part 2) or why I chose a monolingual daycare (by Dr. Catherine Levasseur)

As a new language-learning-crazy-mom who tries to expose her child to a maximum of languages, I made what would seem a bad decision: I chose a monolingual daycare for my baby. Yes I did. Even worse than that, I chose a monolingual day care in the majority language. Adios! Goodbye! Au revoir! plurilinguisme, le sort en est jeté, direz-vous. Well, I had my reasons and I haven’t lost hope in raising a wonderful multilingual child. Here is why. Continue reading