Refusing to inHABIT the binary: Reflections on language, culture and identity in the colonial bubble (by Paul Meighan-Chiblow)

This week’s blog post includes a linked audio file. Just click on the link below if you would like to hear the post read aloud. Scroll down to read the text.

Paul Meighan-Chiblow is a Gàidheal from Glasgow, Scotland and currently a 1st year PhD student at McGill University in the Department of Integrated Studies in Education. He is a proud BILD member since September 2019 and this is his first blog post.

What does it mean to speak a language? What does it mean to belong or subscribe to a culture? And, where do these questions even reside?

**Spoiler alert: This blog entry is critical in Freirean awareness-raising and “problem-posing” terms (and perhaps in others depending on your personal point of view)**

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Spoken Word Poetry and Language Learning and Teaching (by Jennifer Burton)

Have you ever felt words? 

Like, really felt them. 

Maybe in response to a story that you read.

or perhaps something someone important once said.

I took my friend to a spoken word poetry slam last night. I’ve been to several slams myself, but this was her first time attending one. Together we watched seven performers take the stage, sharing snippets of their lives with us. If you’ve attended a poetry slam yourself, you’d be familiar with the finger snaps and the oooos and aaahs from audience members. 
Some poems evoked laughter; other poems left us feeling angry, empathetic, encouraged and hopeful—a myriad of emotions. All of the poems were deeply personal to each poet; yet, in spite of this, we could both relate. There is something incredibly powerful about this shared experience. It is no wonder that Low (2006) says the poem “comes to life in performance and exists in the communion of poet and audience” (Low, 2006, p. 104).

How often do we pay attention to that

which the eye cannot see?

I’m talking, shiver down your spine

an emotional connection, nothing short of divine.

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Reflections on Heritage Language teaching and learning (by Emmanouela Tisizi)

For the past three years, I have been working as a Greek heritage language teacher in a Greek secondary school in Montreal. The first two years, I was assigned grade 10 classes, whereas this year, I was assigned a grade 7 class. I consider myself very fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with students of different ages. Even though I have taken several courses on children’s developmental psychology, pedagogics, and school psychology, I truly believe that being given the opportunity to work with students of different ages has been by far the most informative experience I have had.

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Descendant of the “good” immigrants (by Rhonda Chung)

This week’s blog post includes a linked audio file. Just click on the link below if you would like to hear the post read aloud. Scroll down to read the text.

If I go back to where I come from, it means going back to Toronto.

If I go back to where my parents were born, that country no longer exists.

My parents were born not in Dutch Guiana (Suriname), or French Guiana (Guyane française), or Spanish Guayana (Venezuela), or Portuguese Guiana (Brazil), but in British Guiana (Guyana), a small coastal country located in the north-eastern region of South America.

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